Friday, July 14, 2017

Texas Well Ownder Network (TWON) Workshop!

Lovelady well height: 534.9 ft-msl (118.5 ft- Depth to Water)
Barton Springs: approxamately 95 cfs 10-day average

Texas AgriLife and the Cypress Creek Project are hosting "Well Educated" on Thursday, July 27, 2017, 8:30am – 3:30pm at the Wimberley Community Center. They will go over well maintenance, water quality, treatment, and test a well water sample for FREE! Great training opportunity!

http://www.cypresscreekproject.net/calendar-1/2017/6/27/texas-well-owner-network-twon-workshop



Thursday, May 25, 2017

This Weekend is Tax Free Weekend...Water Efficient Products!

Happy Memorial Day weekend!
You can buy certain water-efficient and water-conserving products tax free during the Water-Efficient Products Sales Tax Holiday—THIS WEEKEND. There is no limit on the number of qualifying items you can buy.

The 2017 holiday begins Saturday, May 27, and goes through Monday, May 29 (Memorial Day).

Examples of tax free purchases:
·         Showerheads, toilets, faucets
·         Soaker hoses, mulch, soil, compost
·         Rain barrels, alternative rain and moisture collection system
·         Plants, trees, grasses


Thursday, May 4, 2017

Beginning of Water Conservation Period

The District’s Water Conservation Period starts Monday, May 1st and extends through the end of September— the time when water use is at its peak.

Since January 2016, groundwater levels in the District have been above drought thresholds.  Recent wet weather has helped augment water supplies, but there is still a need to conserve water resources.  The last drought proved that surface water and groundwater resources are precious and limited.  Water conservation through the summer months can help us delay and/or avoid another drought situation.

Starting on May 1st, Austin Water Utility restricts outdoor watering to no more than twice per week, and the Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District initiates a voluntary 10% reduction in groundwater pumping by its permittees.  Though the approaches are different, the goal is the same—prolong water availability throughout the hottest and driest portion of the year.

John Dupnik, Aquifer District General Manager notes, “Through being mindful of smart water use during the hot summer months, a little effort by individual end-users, when multiplied across central Texas, can do a great amount of good.”

“Our groundwater users are traditionally very conscious of water use.  Simple leak fixes and water conservation choices can add up to make a big difference in extending our long-term water supply,” states Robin Gary, Senior Public Information and Education Coordinator.


Water conservation strategies, rainwater harvesting information, water-wise landscaping ideas, and self irrigation audit guidance is available at www.bseacd.org/education/water-conservation/

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

BSEACD Scientific Presentations

Lovelady well height: 541.43 ft-msl (112.39 ft- Depth to Water)
Barton Springs: approxamately 108 cfs 10-day average

District staff have made several presentations at conferences such as the South Central Geological Society Annual Meeting and the Gulf Coast Geological Society Annual Meeting.  These meetings allow for increased dialog that helps vet and extend research. 


The published abstracts, papers, and several of the presentations are available online:



Friday, April 14, 2017

April 19: Free Well Water Checkup

This year's Well Water Checkup and Ask-An-Expert Open House will be on Wednesday, April 19, 2017.  Screening is available to the first 75 well owners in the District to come in, pre-register and pick up sampling supplies and instructions.  Sample supplies must be picked up by Tuesday, April 18. There are about 30 slots still available.  Come in to get supplies!
 

The USEPA recommends that private water wells should be tested annually for contaminants that can jeopardize the health of its users, especially vulnerable populations like children, the elderly, or those with compromised immune systems.  Samples from private water wells will be screened for common contaminants, including fecal coliform bacteria, nitrates, and salinity. 

You'll be able to bring in your water sample for analysis on April 19; if you come between 11-1 you can talk with a well servicer, septic system expert, water quality expert, water quality lab manager, and District staff while you wait for your results.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

EP Aquifer Test Activities and Timeline

The Electro Purification (EP) aquifer test began in October and will likely finish in the coming weeks.  EP contractors, District staff, and the Edwards Aquifer Authority (EAA) staff are coordinating testing activities and monitoring efforts. Aquifer tests are an essential part of the District's permitting process.  The Board and staff rely heavily on results of these tests to inform permit volumes and conditions.

Synopsis of aquifer test activities:
EP converted the Odell 1 well into a Lower Glen Rose monitor well.  They have developed and pumped Bridges 2 and Bridges 1 for 5 and 7 days, respectively.  Most recently, Odell 2 was developed and tested for 5 days.  During development of Odell 2, EP contractors experienced technical difficulties that delayed the start of the test; however, the pump phase is complete and water level recovery is being recorded.  During all tests, water level and water quality data were collected.  Provisional District water-level data from the deep Cow Creek monitor wells show a measurable response to the pumping.  The measurable response is what is needed to allow calculations of aquifer parameters such as transmissivity and storage.

Currently, the EP contractors requested and received approval to re-test Bridges 2.  After the test was complete, the EP contractors discovered that the original pump assembly installation was not placed properly.  The well will not be developed again, but crews will reinstall the pump assembly and begin pumping in the upcoming weeks.  Water levels are continuously being recorded.

What happens next:
Once the testing is complete and water levels have recovered, both the District staff and EP contractors will compile and check all data collected over the duration of the aquifer test.  Once compiled, organized, and checked, the District will share data with surrounding GCDs and EP contractors.  EP contractors will go through the same process.  After all data is available, EP contractors will analyze the data and propose a permit volume based on those analyses, explained through their Hydrogeologic Report.  The Hydrogeological Report is required with submittal of a production permit application to support a requested permit volume.  When a production permit application is submitted by EP to the District, District staff will review and vet the contractor's Hydrogeologic Report, model effects of the requested volume, and determine whether the requested volume may have potential to cause unreasonable impacts to surrounding wells.  The staff's findings will be presented to the Board to inform the permit desision.

To make the aquifer test more transparent to the groundwater community, the District (with EP's support) posts updates on the EP Aquifer Test Spotlight page.

Barton Springs Hackathon

The Barton Springs Hackathon is a one-day, hands-on, technical workshop focused on unlocking hydrologic data in central Texas for public consumption.  The District has teamed up with the Texas Advanced Computing Center to host the first Barton Springs Hackathon!  With support from the Hill Country Alliance, the Hackathon will be a fun day to learn, teach, and help make data more accessible.


Here’s where you can help –  we need everybody from coders to scientists to educators that can unlock the information collected from a large network of monitoring sites and help well owners and central Texas residents understand the groundwater system that feeds Barton Springs. Join a project team and lend your expertise to the challenge!
Read more here!

Thursday, December 8, 2016

2016 Edwards Aquifer Status In Review

Lovelady well height: 542.25 ft-msl (11.44 ft-Depth to Water)
Barton Springs: approximately 109 cfs 10-day average 

2016 began in a status of No Drought following a very wet 2015 summer and. Those summer and rains augmented a trend which initiated back in September 2014, when water levels began to rise after above-average rainfall. Steady recharge continued to increase aquifer water levels, as well as Barton Springs flow. In January of 2015, the Board updated the drought status from Stage II Alarm Drought to No Drought. This change has remained in effect throughout 2016, as Edwards water levels have continued to rise. To note, recent measurements indicate the beginning of a decline starting October 11th.

An overall wet 2016 produced long periods of recharge, resulting in the second highest water level elevation for the District’s Edwards Aquifer drought index well, the Lovelady Monitor Well. Water levels peaked on October 5, 2016 at 545.8 ft-msl, second to the 547.2 ft-msl recorded on June 2,1992. The Lovelady Monitor Well has recorded data since 1949.

Almost mirroring the rejuvenating effects of 2015, periods of heavy rainfall in 2016 have continued to boost the Edwards Aquifer. For close comparison total rainfall for 2015, measured at Camp Mabry, was 59”, and 2016 is coming in at a close 55”

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Hill Country Alliance's 7th Annual Rainwater Revival!


Come join BSEACD and many others for the  Hill Country Alliance's 2016 Rainwater Revival event November 5th (Saturday) at the Dripping Springs Ranch Park from 10 am to 4 pm in Dripping Springs. The day will be full of fun, education and celebration!

As we all know, water is scarce in the Texas Hill Country. With our drought-and-flood climate and stressed water supply, alternatives to traditional water project development can help increase reliability, conserve resources and protect the environment. An effective, desirable and responsible alternative is rainwater harvesting.
Now in its 7th year, the Rainwater Revival brings together homeowners, builders, vendors and conservation experts to connect, share and celebrate the ancient tradition of harvesting rainwater.
For more information visit here.

EP Aquifer Test Approved

Aquifer tests are an essential part of the District's permitting process.  The Board and staff rely heavily on results of these tests to inform permit volumes and conditions.

In the spring, Electro Purification (EP) submitted a test well application to allow them to perform an aquifer test on three wells.  District staff worked with EP to design and plan an aquifer test that meets District guidelines.  The aquifer test will measure responses to abbreviated pumping simulations from the target pumping zone (Middle Trinity--Cow Creek Formation) in surrounding Upper, Middle, and Lower Trinity wells (generalized stratigraphic column showing aquifers and associated formations).  The aquifer test is a collaborative effort between the District and EP and will take two to three months to complete.

Synopsis of aquifer test activities:
EP contractors will convert the Odell 1 well into a Lower Glen Rose monitor well.  They will plug the bottom portion of the well to seal off the Cow Creek formation, so water level monitoring in the Middle Trinity above the target pumping zone can be monitored.  Then EP contractors will develop and install temporary well completions in the three test wells that allow pumping to be isolated to the target pumping zone.  They will develop and test Bridges 1 then move to Bridges 2, then Odell 2.  During the development and testing, EP contractors and District staff will be sampling water quality and water levels.  EP contractors are responsible for monitoring/sampling wells on EP leases.  District staff are coordinating with surrounding well owners to monitor/sample additional monitor well sites.  As agreed with EP, District staff will be at the well site to observe key well development and testing activities.

In anticipation of community interest and information requests and to make the aquifer test more transparent to the groundwater community, the District (with EP's support) has created a Permit Notice: EP Aquifer Test web page with the following the following information:
  • Review process overview for EP test well application
  • Timeline of key application dates
  • Discussion of well development/aquifer testing procedures
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • EP's approved aquifer test plan